A secure internet connection is not just the ideal — it’s essential. In fact, we’re going to go as far as saying it’s the number one priority for your website. The “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error protects your connection from certain malicious attacks, although in some cases, you can inadvertently cause the error too.

The error is related to your Secure Shell (SSH) keys and the server “fingerprint” a client will check for. If Secure Shell thinks there’s an issue, it will block access to your server and throw an error. But you can fix this in a few steps.

Over the next few minutes, we’re going to show you how to fix the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error for both Windows and Mac. First, though, let’s give you some more details on the error message itself.

A secure internet connection is not just the ideal — it's essential 💪 While it may be annoying, this error protects your connection from attacks. 🙅‍♀️ Learn more ⬇️Click to Tweet

What the “Warning: Remote Host Identification Has Changed” Error Is

One of the most secure ways to connect to a web server is to use SSH. It’s a command-line tool that lets you access an insecure network securely. Consider it like a “super-SFTP” type of setup, although it’s not a 1:1 comparison in practice.

You can access your site from almost anywhere you can use the internet, as long as you have the right login credentials. What’s more, most macOS and Linux machines have an SSH client built into the Operating System (OS). For Windows, you’ll use a dedicated interface (and we’ll talk about this in more detail later).

As for the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error, it relates to the security checks your client will do. An SSH connection uses dedicated “keys” — small files stored on your computer — as authentication. It’s sort of like a Secure Sockets Layers (SSL) handshake, and in fact, there are some high-level similarities between SSH and SSL.

One aspect the keys help with is to provide a permanent fingerprint of its host server. This will make sure the connection is accurate and that you’re not subject to a “machine-in-the-middle” attack.

If the client thinks those fingerprints differ from what it understands to be correct, you’ll get the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error at the point of login:

[[email protected] ~]$ ssh [email protected]

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@ WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED! @

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING NASTY!

Someone could be eavesdropping on you right now (man-in-the-middle attack)!

It is also possible that a host key has just been changed.

The fingerprint for the RSA key sent by the remote host is

xx:xx:xx.

Please contact your system administrator.

Add correct host key in /home/hostname /.ssh/known_hosts to get rid of this message.

Offending RSA key in /var/lib/sss/pubconf/known_hosts:4

RSA host key for user has changed and you have requested strict checking.

Host key verification failed.

As errors go, this is detailed and clear — it tells you what’s happened, a potential reason for why, and how you might fix it.

However, there’s one aspect we can touch on a little further before showing you how to fix the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error.

How the known_hosts File Helps SSH Authentication

You’ll notice that the error message references a known_hosts file. The name should give you a clue as to what it contains, but for clarity, it’s a list of SSH remote hosts known to the computer. It’s used as a reference client file for the authentication process.

When you first connect to a server, you’ll often get a confirmation request through your interface, asking whether you want to connect. If so, this fingerprint will become part of your known_hosts file.

Of course, if the fingerprint differs from what is in the known_hosts file, this could indicate a malicious user is targeting you. In other cases, you may already know why there’s a difference, although it pays to be vigilant regardless.

How To Fix the “Warning: Remote Host Identification Has Changed” Error (on Windows and Mac)

You can work to fix the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error for both Windows and macOS. However, you have more flexibility for doing so on Mac.

We’ll cover lots of the ways you can make things right again, starting with Windows.

1. Windows

It’s important to note that Windows machines might not have a known_hosts file. However, if you use the OpenSSH client, there is a file. To find it, open the Windows search bar, and navigate to your user folder with the %USERPROFILE% command.

This will open the directory within the File Explorer. There will also be a .ssh folder within:

The Windows File Explorer.
The Windows File Explorer.

The file we want in this folder is known_hosts. You can open this with Notepad (or your favorite text editor). Inside will be a list of keys:

The Windows known_hosts file.
The Windows known_hosts file.

Here, you can delete the key that’s causing the problem, then resave the file.

Some users may prefer the PuTTY client. The keys sit in the Registry, although they perform the same purpose as OpenSSH.

You’ll want to open the Windows Registry Editor (otherwise known as “regedit”). You can do this in whatever way you’re comfortable, but the quickest way is to type the app’s name into Window’s search bar:

The Registry Editor link in the Windows Start menu.
The Registry Editor link in the Windows Start menu.

Here, look for the following destination within regedit:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER/Software/SimonTatham/PuTTY/SshHostKeys/

You’ll see a list of entries here relating to the saved connections on your computer. Your job is to delete whichever one is causing an issue:

Deleting a Registry key in regedit.
Deleting a Registry key in regedit.

Once you click on the Delete button, you’ll also need to confirm that you want to remove the key:

The Confirm Value Delete dialog.
The Confirm Value Delete dialog.

Clicking Yes here means the key will be gone for good, and you shouldn’t get the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error any longer.

2. Mac

The Mac has a couple of ways to fix the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error — either through a premium app such as SSH Config Editor or the Terminal. The results will be the same, so we advise you to choose whichever option is more comfortable (and budget-friendly).

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Our preferred approach is to access the file within a Terminal window (or iTerm2 if you use that app), and also open it with a dedicated Nano or Vim editor. This is because it’s accessible to everyone and straightforward to use regardless of your experience level.

Here, we’re going to use Nano. First, open your Terminal using whatever process is most comfortable:

Opening the Terminal from Spotlight.
Opening the Terminal from Spotlight.

From here, run the nano ~/.ssh/known_hosts command in your window. This will open a new Nano instance and display the keys within your known_hosts file:

The Nano editor with the known_hosts file open.
The Nano editor with the known_hosts file open.

You should delete the key causing the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error, then save your changes.

You might also want to delete the entire known_hosts file, especially if you only use SSH for one or two sites. To do this, you can run rm .ssh/known_hosts in a Terminal window.

There’s one more method to alter the known_hosts file on Mac: using the ssh-keygen utility from the command line. This is great if you don’t want to dig into the file itself, or if you want to work with only one site or key.

To achieve this, open a Terminal window and run ssh-keygen, followed by your server hostname. For example:

ssh-keygen -R server.example.com

This won’t ask you if you want to delete the specified lines, so make sure you’re removing the right ones before proceeding:

Using ssh-keygen to delete from the known_hosts file.
Using ssh-keygen to delete from the known_hosts file.

Once this is done, you shouldn’t get the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error from there on out.

Ever seen this error? 😅 It's not always a bad thing (it's protecting your connection from malicious attacks!), but it can be accidentally caused by your own activity. 😬 Learn more in this guide ⬇️Click to Tweet

Summary

Web security isn’t just about installing plugins and creating a strong password. The connections you use to log into servers need your utmost attention. If you don’t want to be subject to a machine-in-the-middle attack, you’ll want to use SSH access when you log in.

However, the system works almost too well. You may get the “Warning: Remote host identification has changed” error for a few reasons, and some are innocent.

Regardless, you can fix the error in no time through a Command Prompt or Terminal, using just a handful of commands.


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