Many people complain about the hurdles of getting started with building Gutenberg blocks and apps. The learning curve is steep, mainly due to the difficulty of installing and configuring the development environment. In addition, a solid knowledge of JavaScript, Node.js, React, and Redux are must-have ingredients for this fairly complex recipe.

The official WordPress Block Editor Handbook provides developers with a tremendous amount of information, but you may find yourself lost in that sea of details.

And it’s worth mentioning what Matías Ventura, lead architect of the Gutenberg project, reported in his interview with WP Tavern:

While there are folks that can learn it quickly, it’s still a big barrier for people. I think there are several layers to this; documentation could be an order of magnitude better in both organization and presentation. I hope we can do a lot more there.

With that in mind, we’ve decided to provide a step-by-step tutorial aimed at helping our readers get started with Gutenberg block development.

Sound interesting? Let’s dive in!

Gutenberg Block Development Prerequisites

For this tutorial, the only required skills are a good knowledge of WordPress plugin development and at least a basic understanding of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and React.

Will this be an ambitious project? You bet it will be!

It wasn’t easy to find the right compromise between completeness and simplicity or decide which topics to include and which to leave out.

Hopefully, intermediate and advanced readers will forgive us for not delving deeply into certain concepts such as React state, Redux store, high order components, and so on. These topics require additional space and attention and are probably too advanced for beginning block development (unless you’re a React developer).

For the same reason, we won’t be covering some of the more advanced topics related to Gutenberg block development, such as dynamic blocks and meta boxes.

With the knowledge you’ll gain by the end of this article, you’ll be able to start having fun and being productive right away.

Once you get going with block building, you’ll be poised to improve your skills further and build even more advanced Gutenberg blocks on your own.

Starting with Gutenberg block development can be intimidating at first… 😵‍💫 But no fear! This complete guide for beginners has you covered 🙏Click to Tweet

 

What Is a Gutenberg Block?

Since it was first released in December 2018, the block editor has been greatly improved in all aspects: more powerful APIs, a more advanced user interface, improved usability, a ton of new blocks, the first implementations of Full Site Editing, and much more.

In short, even if Gutenberg is still under heavy development, it has come a long way — and today, the block editor is a full-fledged candidate as a reliable, functional page and site builder.

From a developer’s point of view, Gutenberg is a React-based Single Page Application (SPA) that allows WordPress users to create, edit, and delete content in WordPress. However, this should not make you think of an enhanced version of the traditional content editor.

We want to make this clear:

In Gutenberg, the content is divided into blocks, which are “bricks” that users can use to create posts and pages or their entire websites.

But what technically is a block?

We like WordPress’ definition:

“Block” is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage. The idea combines concepts of what in WordPress today we achieve with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.

Titles, paragraphs, columns, images, galleries, and all the elements that make up the editor’s interface, from sidebar panels to block toolbar controls, are React components.

So, what are React components? W3Schools provides the following definition:

Components are independent and reusable bits of code. They serve the same purpose as JavaScript functions, but work in isolation and return HTML via a render() function.

Working with Gutenberg blocks in WordPress 5.8.
Working with Gutenberg blocks in WordPress 5.8.

While the editing experience delivered by Gutenberg is new compared to the classic WordPress editor, the way WordPress stores your pieces of content in the database doesn’t change at all. That’s because Gutenberg is an application that works within WordPress but doesn’t change the way the CMS works at its core.

Posts (and this includes posts, pages, and custom post types) created with Gutenberg are still stored in the wp_posts table, exactly as with the classic editor.

But in a post created with Gutenberg, you’ll find additional bits of information in the table that represent a fundamental difference between posts created via the Classic Editor vs Gutenberg.

These pieces of information look like HTML comments, and they have a specific function: delimiting blocks:

A blog post in Code editor view.
A blog post in Code editor view.

Block delimiters tell WordPress what block is to be rendered on the screen. They also provide values for block properties in a JSON object. Those props dictate the way the block should be rendered on the screen:

A blog post stored in the wp_posts table.
A blog post stored in the wp_posts table.

Setting Up Your WordPress Development Environment

Setting up a modern JavaScript development environment requires a solid knowledge of advanced technologies such as Webpack, React and JSX, Babel, ESLint, etc.

Intimidated? Don’t be! The WordPress community has already come to the rescue by providing powerful tools that let you avoid a messy manual configuration process.

To keep things simple, we won’t cover transpiling in this article (which we nevertheless recommend familiarizing yourself with once you’ve learned the basics of block development). Instead, we’ll introduce two alternative tools you can use to quickly and easily set up a modern JavaScript development environment in few minutes. It’s up to you to choose the one you find most convenient for your project.

Setting up a JavaScript development environment to build Gutenberg blocks is a three-step process:

  1. Install Node.js and npm
  2. Set up the development environment
  3. Set up the block plugin

Let’s get started.

1. Install Node.js and npm

Before installing your development environment and registering your first block, you’ll need to install Node.js and the Node package manager (npm).

You can install Node.js and npm in several different ways. But first, you may want to check if the software is already installed on your machine.

To do this, launch the terminal and run the following command:

node -v

If the result is command not found, then Node.js is not installed on your computer, and you can proceed with the installation.

For this article, we’ve chosen the easiest installation option, which is the Node Installer. All you need to do is download the version corresponding to your operating system and launch the installation wizard:

Node.js Downloads page.
Node.js Downloads page.

Once you’ve installed Node.js, run the command node -v in your terminal again. You can also run the npm -v command to confirm that you have the npm package available.

You’re now equipped with the following tools:

The next step is to install the development environment.

2. Set Up Your Development Environment

Once you have the latest versions of Node.js and npm on your local machine, you’ll need a development environment for WordPress.

You can either use a local development environment like DevKinsta or use the official WordPress tool. Let’s take a peek at both options.

Option 1: Local Development Environment (DevKinsta)

With just a few clicks, you can install WordPress locally using DevKinsta, our modern local WordPress development tool. Or you could opt for a different local development tool, such as MAMP or XAMPP:

Create a new WordPress website in DevKinsta.
Create a new WordPress website in DevKinsta.

Option 2: wp-env

You can also opt for the official wp-env tool, which provides a local WordPress dev environment you can launch directly from the command line. Noah Alen defines it as follows:

Local WordPress environments are now as simple as running a single command. wp-env is a zero config tool for painless local WordPress environments. It provides decisions over options so that users can quickly spin up WordPress without wasting time. Indeed, the goal is to make these environments easily accessible to all — whether you’re a developer, designer, manager, or anyone else.

If you decide to give it a try, installing wp-env requires minimal effort. Just follow these steps:

Step 1: Confirm Docker and Node.js Installation

To meet the technical requirements, you’ll first need to have both Docker and Node.js installed on your computer. That’s because wp-env creates a Docker instance running a WordPress website. Any changes made to the code are immediately reflected in the WordPress instance.

Step 2: Install @wordpress/env from the Command Line

With Docker and Node.js running on your computer, you can move on and install the WordPress development environment.

You can install wp-env either globally or locally. To do it globally, you’ll need to run the following command from within the plugins directory (more on this in the “Important” notice box below):

npm install -g @wordpress/env

Let’s break that down:

To confirm that wp-env has been successfully installed, run the following command:

wp-env --version

You should see the current wp-env version, which means you can now launch the environment using the following command from your plugin’s folder:

wp-env start

You can access the WordPress dashboard using the following address:

The default credentials are as follows:

Set Up Your Block Plugin

Now you need a starter block plugin to build upon. But instead of manually creating a development block plugin with all necessary files and folders, you can simply run a dev-tool providing all files and configurations you need to get started with block development.

Again, you have a couple of options to choose from. Let’s take a look at each.

Option 1: Setting Up a Block Plugin With @wordpress/create-block

@wordpress/create-block is the official zero configuration tool for creating Gutenberg blocks:

Create Block is an officially supported way to create blocks for registering a block for a WordPress plugin. It offers a modern build setup with no configuration. It generates PHP, JS, CSS code, and everything else you need to start the project.

It is largely inspired by create-react-app. Major kudos to @gaearon, the whole Facebook team, and the React community.

Once your local environment is up and running, you can set up a starter block by simply running the npx @wordpress/create-block command, and it will provide all the files and folders you need to create the plugin scaffolding and register a new block.

Let’s run a test to see how it works.

From your Command Line tool, navigate to the /wp-content/plugins/ directory and run the following command:

npx @wordpress/create-block my-first-block

When asked to confirm, enter y to proceed:

Creating a block with @wordpress/create-block.
Creating a block with @wordpress/create-block.

The process takes few moments. When it’s complete, you should get the following response:

The block plugin has been created.
The block plugin has been created.

And that’s it!

Now launch your WordPress development environment and go to the Plugins screen in the WordPress dashboard. A new plugin named “My First Block” should have been added to your plugin list:

The block plugin has been successfully installed.
The block plugin has been successfully installed.

Activate the plugin if needed, create a new blog post, scroll down the block inserter to the Widgets section, and select your new block:

An example block created with @wordpress/create-block.
An example block created with @wordpress/create-block.

Now go back to the terminal and change the current directory to my-first-block:

cd my-first-block

Then run the following command:

npm start

This enables you to run the plugin in development mode. To create the production code, you should use the following command:

npm run build

Option 2: Setting Up a Block Plugin With create-guten-block

create-guten-block is a third-party development tool for building Gutenberg blocks:

create-guten-block is zero configuration dev-toolkit (#0CJS) to develop WordPress Gutenberg blocks in a matter of minutes without configuring React, webpack, ES6/7/8/Next, ESLint, Babel, etc.

Just like the official create-block tool, create-guten-block is based on create-react-app and can help you generate your first block plugin with no hassle.

The toolkit provides everything you need to create a modern WordPress plugin, including the following:

  • React, JSX, and ES6 syntax support.
  • webpack dev/production build process behind the scene.
  • Language extras beyond ES6 like the object spread operator.
  • Auto-prefixed CSS, so you don’t need -webkit or other prefixes.
  • A build script to bundle JS, CSS, and images for production with source-maps.
  • Hassle-free updates for the above tools with a single dependency cgb-scripts.

Note the following caveat:

The tradeoff is that these tools are preconfigured to work in a specific way. If your project needs more customization, you can “eject” and customize it, but then you will need to maintain this configuration.

Once you have a local WordPress website on hand, launch your Command Line tool, navigate to the /wp-content/plugins folder of your installation, and run the following command:

npx create-guten-block my-first-block

You’ll have to wait a minute or two while the project structure is created and dependencies downloaded:

Creating a Gutenberg block with create-guten-block.
Creating a Gutenberg block with create-guten-block.

When the process is complete, you should see the following screen:

Gutenberg block successfully created with create-guten-block.
Gutenberg block successfully created with create-guten-block.

This next image shows the project structure with the terminal running in Visual Studio Code:

The block plugin in Visual Studio Code.
The block plugin in Visual Studio Code.

Now go back to your WordPress dashboard. A new item should be listed in the Plugins screen — it’s the my-first-block plugin:

The Plugins screen with a new plugin created with create-guten-block.
The Plugins screen with a new plugin created with create-guten-block.

Activate the plugin and go back to the terminal. Change the current directory to my-first-block, then run npm start:

cd my-first-block
npm start

You should get the following response:

npm started.
npm started.

Again, this enables you to run the plugin in development mode. To create the production code, you should use:

npm run build

Activate the plugin and create a new post or page, then browse your blocks and select your brand new Gutenberg block:

A new block created with create-guten-block.
A new block created with create-guten-block.

For a more in-depth overview or in case of errors, refer to the documentation provided by Ahmad Awais.

A Walkthrough of the Starter Block Scaffolding

Whichever of the two dev-tools — create-block or create-guten-block — you opt for, you now have a block scaffolding you can use as a starting point to build a block plugin.

But what exactly is block scaffolding?

Block scaffolding is a shorthand term that describes the supporting directory structure you need for WordPress to recognize a block. Typically that directory includes files like index.php, index.js, style.css, and others — which in turn hold calls like register_block_type.

We opted for the official Create Block dev-tool, as it’s used in the Block Editor Handbook. But even if you’d decide to go with a third-party tool like create-guten-block, your experience won’t be too different.

With that said, let’s dive deeper into the create-block tool.

A Closer Look at the Create Block Dev-Tool

As we mentioned above, Create Block is the official command-line tool to create Gutenberg blocks. Running @wordpress/create-block in your terminal generates the PHP, JS, and SCSS files and code needed to register a new block type:

npx @wordpress/create-block [options] [slug]

By default, an ESNext template is assigned. This means that you’ll get the next version of JavaScript, with the addition of the JSX syntax.

If you omit the block name, the command runs in interactive mode, enabling you to customize several options before generating the files:

npx @wordpress/create-block
Running create-block in interactive mode.
Running create-block in interactive mode.

The image below shows the file structure of a block plugin created with the official Create Block tool:

Files and folders of a block plugin created with @wordpress/create-block.
Files and folders of a block plugin created with @wordpress/create-block.

With that said, let’s go through the main files and folders of our new block plugin.

The Plugin File

With the main plugin file you register the block on the server:

/**
 * Plugin Name: My First Block
 * Description: Example block written with ESNext standard and JSX support – build step required.
 * Requires at least: 5.8
 * Requires PHP: 7.0
 * Version: 0.1.0
 * Author: The WordPress Contributors
 * License: GPL-2.0-or-later
 * License URI: https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html
 * Text Domain: my-first-block
 *
 * @package create-block
 */
/**
 * Registers the block using the metadata loaded from the `block.json` file.
 * Behind the scenes, it registers also all assets so they can be enqueued
 * through the block editor in the corresponding context.
 *
 * @see https://developer.wordpress.org/block-editor/tutorials/block-tutorial/writing-your-first-block-type/
 */
function create_block_my_first_block_block_init() {
	register_block_type( __DIR__ );
}
add_action( 'init', 'create_block_my_first_block_block_init' );

The register_block_type function registers a block type on the server using the metadata stored in the block.json file.

The function takes two parameters:

In the code above, the block type argument is provided by the __DIR__ magic constant. That means that the block.json file resides in the same folder as the plugin’s file.

The package.json File

The package.json file defines JavaScript properties and scripts for your project. This is where you can install your project dependencies.

To better understand what this file is meant for, open it with your favorite code editor:

{
	"name": "my-first-block",
	"version": "0.1.0",
	"description": "Example block written with ESNext standard and JSX support – build step required.",
	"author": "The WordPress Contributors",
	"license": "GPL-2.0-or-later",
	"main": "build/index.js",
	"scripts": {
		"build": "wp-scripts build",
		"format": "wp-scripts format",
		"lint:css": "wp-scripts lint-style",
		"lint:js": "wp-scripts lint-js",
		"start": "wp-scripts start",
		"packages-update": "wp-scripts packages-update"
	},
	"dependencies": {
		"@wordpress/block-editor": "^7.0.1",
		"@wordpress/blocks": "^11.0.1",
		"@wordpress/i18n": "^4.2.1"
	},
	"devDependencies": {
		"@wordpress/scripts": "^18.0.0"
	}
}

The scripts property is a dictionary containing commands that are run at various times in the lifecycle of a package using npm run [cmd].

In this article, we’ll be using the following commands:

dependencies and devDependencies are two objects mapping a package name to a version. dependencies are required in production, while devDependences are only needed for local development (read more).

The only default dev dependency is the @wordpress/scripts package, which is defined as “a collection of reusable scripts tailored for WordPress development.”

The block.json File

Starting with WordPress 5.8, the block.json metadata file is the canonical way to register block types.

Having a block.json file provides several benefits, including improved performance and better visibility on the WordPress Plugins Directory:

From a performance perspective, when themes support lazy loading assets, blocks registered with block.json will have their asset enqueuing optimized out of the box. The frontend CSS and JavaScript assets listed in the style or script properties will only be enqueued when the block is present on the page, resulting in reduced page sizes.

Running the @wordpress/create-block command generates the following block.json file:

{
	"apiVersion": 2,
	"name": "create-block/my-first-block",
	"version": "0.1.0",
	"title": "My First Block",
	"category": "widgets",
	"icon": "smiley",
	"description": "Example block written with ESNext standard and JSX support – build step required.",
	"supports": {
		"html": false
	},
	"textdomain": "my-first-block",
	"editorScript": "file:./build/index.js",
	"editorStyle": "file:./build/index.css",
	"style": "file:./build/style-index.css"
}

Here’s the full list of default properties:

In addition to the properties listed above, you can (and probably will) define an attributes object providing information about data stored by your block. In your block.json you can set any number of attributes in key/value pairs, where the key is the attribute name and the value is is the attribute definition.

Take a look at the following example of attribute definitions:

"attributes": {
	"content": {
		"type": "array",
		"source": "children",
		"selector": "p"
	},
	"align": {
		"type": "string",
		"default": "none"
	},
	"link": { 
		"type": "string", 
		"default": "https://kinsta.com" 
	}
},

We’ll dive deeper into the block.json file later in the article, but you may also want to check the Block Editor Handbook for more detailed information about block.json metadata and attributes.

The src Folder

The src folder is where the development happens. In that folder, you’ll find the following files:

index.js

The index.js file is your starting point. Here you will import dependencies and register the block type on the client:

import { registerBlockType } from '@wordpress/blocks';
import './style.scss';
import Edit from './edit';
import save from './save';

registerBlockType('create-block/my-first-block', {
	edit: Edit,
	save,
});

The first statement imports the registerBlockType function from the @wordpress/blocks package. The following import statements import the stylesheet along with the Edit and save functions.

The registerBlockType function registers the component on the client. The function takes two parameters: a block name namespace/block-name (the same as registered on the server) and a block configuration object.

The Edit function provides the block interface as rendered in the block editor, while the save function provides the structure that will be serialized and saved into the database (read more).

edit.js

edit.js is where you’ll build the block admin interface:

import { __ } from '@wordpress/i18n';
import { useBlockProps } from '@wordpress/block-editor';
import './editor.scss';

export default function Edit() {
	return (
		<p {...useBlockProps()}>
			{__('My First Block – hello from the editor!', 'my-first-block')}
		</p>
	);
}

First, it imports the __ function from the @wordpress/i18n package (this package contains a JavaScript version of the translation functions), the useBlockProps React hook, and the editor.scss file.

Following that, it exports the React component (read more about import and export statements).

save.js

The save.js file is where we build the block structure to be saved into the database:

import { __ } from '@wordpress/i18n';
import { useBlockProps } from '@wordpress/block-editor';

export default function save() {
	return (
		<p {...useBlockProps.save()}>
			{__(
				'My First Block – hello from the saved content!',
				'my-first-block'
			)}
		</p>
	);
}

editor.scss and style.scss

Apart from the scripts, two SASS files reside in the src folders. The editor.scss file contains the styles applied to the block in the editor’s context, while the style.scss file contains the styles of the block for display in the frontend. We’ll dive deeper into these files in the second part of this guide.

The node_modules and build Folders

The node_modules folder contains node modules and their dependencies. We won’t dive deeper into node packages as it is beyond the scope of this article, but you can read more in this article on where npm installs the packages.

The build folder contains the JS and CSS files resulting from the build process. You can dive deeper into the build process in ESNext syntax and JavaScript Build Setup guides.

The Project: Building Your First Gutenberg Block

It’s time to get our hands dirty. This section will teach you how to create a plugin providing a CTA block named Affiliate Block.

The block will consist of two columns, with an image on the left and a text paragraph on the right. A button with a customizable link will be placed below the text:

The block type you will learn to build in this guide.
The block type you will learn to build in this guide.

This is just a simple example, but it allows us to cover the basics of Gutenberg block development. Once you get a clear understanding of the basics, you can go ahead and create more and more complex Gutenberg blocks with the help of the Block Editor Handbook and any other of the vast resources available out there.

Assuming that you have the latest version of WordPress running on your local development environment, here’s what you’re going to learn from here on:

Ready… set… go!

How to Set Up the Starter Block Plugin

Launch your command-line tool and navigate to the /wp-content/plugins folder:

New terminal at folder in Mac OS.
New terminal at folder in Mac OS.

Now, run the following command:

npx @wordpress/create-block

This command generates the PHP, SCSS, and JS files for registering a block in interactive mode, allowing you to add the necessary data for your block easily. For our example we’ll use the following details:

Installing the plugin and all dependencies takes a couple of minutes. When the process is complete, you’ll see the following response:

The Affiliate block has been installed and registered for development.
The Affiliate block has been installed and registered for development.

Now, run the following command from the /wp-content/plugins folder:

cd my-affiliate-block
Running commands from Visual Studio Code Terminal.
Running commands from Visual Studio Code Terminal.

Finally, from within your plugin’s folder (my-affiliate-block in our example), you can start development with:

npm start

Now open the Plugins screen to find and activate the Affiliate Block plugin:

Affiliate Block plugin.
Affiliate Block plugin.

Create a new post, open the block inserter, and scroll down to the Design category. Click to add the Affiliate Block:

A starter block built with @wordpress/create-block.
A starter block built with @wordpress/create-block.

block.json at Work

As we mentioned earlier, the server-side block registration takes place in the main .php file. However, we won’t define settings in the .php file. Instead, we’ll be using the block.json file.

So, open block.json again and take a closer look at the default settings:

{
	"apiVersion": 2,
	"name": "my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-block",
	"version": "0.1.0",
	"title": "Affiliate Block",
	"category": "design",
	"icon": "money",
	"description": "An example block for Kinsta readers",
	"supports": {
		"html": false
	},
	"textdomain": "my-affiliate-block",
	"editorScript": "file:./build/index.js",
	"editorStyle": "file:./build/index.css",
	"style": "file:./build/style-index.css"
}

Scripts and Styles

editorScript, editorStyle, and style properties provide the relative paths to frontend and backend scripts and styles.

You don’t have to manually register the scripts and styles defined here because these are automatically registered and enqueued by WordPress. To prove that, launch the browser inspector and open the Network tab:

Inspecting resources in Chrome DevTools.
Inspecting resources in Chrome DevTools.

As you can see from the image above, our index.js script residing in the build folder has been regularly enqueued without having to add any PHP code.

UI Labels

The title and description properties provide the labels needed to identify the block in the editor:

Block name and description in the block sidebar.
Block name and description in the block sidebar.

Keywords

As we mentioned earlier, you can accurately configure your block settings using properties and attributes. For example, you can add one or more keywords to help users search blocks:

{ "keywords": [ "kinsta", "affiliate", "money" ] }

If you now input “kinsta”, “affiliate” or “money” in the quick inserter, the editor will suggest you the Affiliate block:

Searching for a block using a keyword in the quick inserter.
Searching for a block using a keyword in the quick inserter.

Localization

If you are wondering how the localization of the strings in the JSON file happens, here is the answer:

In JavaScript, you can use now registerBlockTypeFromMetadata method from @wordpress/blocks package to register a block type using the metadata loaded from block.json file. All localized properties get automatically wrapped in _x (from @wordpress/i18n package) function calls similar to how it works in PHP with register_block_type_from_metadata. The only requirement is to set the textdomain property in the block.json file.

Here we are using the registerBlockType function instead of registerBlockTypeFromMetadata, as the latter has been deprecated since Gutenberg 10.7, but the mechanism is the same.

Using Built-In Components: The RichText Component

The elements that make up a Gutenberg block are React components, and you can access these components via the wp global variable. For example, try to type wp.editor into your browser’s console. This will give you the full list of the components included in the wp.editor module.

Scroll through the list and guess what components are meant for by their names.

Similarly, you can check the list of components included in the wp.components module:

WP Editor components.
WP Editor components.

Now go back to the edit.js file and take a closer look at the script:

import { __ } from '@wordpress/i18n';
import { useBlockProps } from '@wordpress/block-editor';
import './editor.scss';

export default function Edit() {
	return (
		<p {...useBlockProps()}>
			{__('My First Block – hello from the editor!', 'my-first-block')}
		</p>
	);
}

This code generates a static block with simple, non-editable text. But we can change things easily:

The starter block in the code editor.
The starter block in the code editor.

To make the text editable you’ll have to replace the current <p> tag with a component that makes the input content editable. For that, Gutenberg provides the built-in RichText component.

Adding a built-in component to your block is a 5 step process:

  1. Import the required components from a WordPress package
  2. Include the corresponding elements into your JSX code
  3. Define the necessary attributes in the block.json file
  4. Define event handlers
  5. Save data

Step 1: Import the Required Components from a WordPress Package

Now open the edit.js file and change the following import statement:

import { useBlockProps } from '@wordpress/block-editor';

…to:

import { useBlockProps, RichText } from '@wordpress/block-editor';

This way, you’re importing the useBlockProps function and RichText component from the @wordpress/block-editor package.

useBlockProps

The useBlockProps React hook marks the block’s wrapper element:

When using API version 2, you must use the new useBlockProps hook in the block’s edit function to mark the block’s wrapper element. The hook will insert attributes and event handlers needed to enable block behavior. Any attributes you wish to pass to the block element must be passed through useBlockProps and the returned value be spread onto the element.

To put things simply, useBlockProps automatically assign attributes and classes to the wrapper element (the p element in our example):

Elements and classes generated by useBlockProps.
Elements and classes generated by useBlockProps.

If you remove useBlockProps from the wrapper element, you’d have a simple text string with no access to block functionality and style:

The same block without useBlockProps.
The same block without useBlockProps.

As we’ll explain later, you can also pass to useBlockProps an object of properties to customize the output.

RichText

The RichText component provides a contenteditable input, allowing users to edit and format the content.

You’ll find the component documented on GitHub at gutenberg/packages/block-editor/src/components/rich-text/README.md.

Step 2: Include the Corresponding Elements Into Your JSX Code

...

const blockProps = useBlockProps();

return (
	<RichText 
		{ ...blockProps }
		tagName="p"
		onChange={ onChangeContent }
		allowedFormats={ [ 'core/bold', 'core/italic' ] }
		value={ attributes.content }
		placeholder={ __( 'Write your text...' ) }
	/>
);

Let’s comment on the code line by line:

Step 3: Define the Necessary Attributes in the block.json File

Attributes provide information about the data stored by a block, such as rich content, background color, URLs, etc.

You can set an arbitrary number of attributes within an attributes object in key/value pairs, where the key is the attribute name and the value is the attribute definition.

Now open the block.json file and add the following attributes prop:

"attributes": {
	"content": {
		"type": "string",
		"source": "html",
		"selector": "p"
	}
},

The content attribute allows to store the text typed by the user in the editable field:

We will pass the Edit function an object of properties. So, go back to the edit.js file and make the following change:

export default function Edit( { attributes, setAttributes } ) { ... }

Step 4: Define Event Handlers

The RichText element has an onChange attribute, providing a function to call when the element’s content changes.

Let’s define that function and see the whole edit.js script:

import { __ } from '@wordpress/i18n';
import { useBlockProps, RichText } from '@wordpress/block-editor';
import './editor.scss';

export default function Edit( { attributes, setAttributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps();

	const onChangeContent = ( newContent ) => {
		setAttributes( { content: newContent } )
	}

	return (
		<RichText 
			{ ...blockProps }
			tagName="p"
			onChange={ onChangeContent }
			allowedFormats={ [ 'core/bold', 'core/italic' ] }
			value={ attributes.content }
			placeholder={ __( 'Write your text...' ) }
		/>
	);
}

Now save the file and run npm run start in your terminal window. Then, go back to your WordPress dashboard, create a new post or page and add your Affiliate block:

The output of the RichText component in the Block Editor.
The output of the RichText component in the Block Editor.

Add some text and switch to Code view. Here is what your code should look like:

<!-- wp:my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-block -->
<p class="wp-block-my-affiliate-plugin-my-affiliate-block">This is my first editable Gutenberg block 🤓</p>
<!-- /wp:my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-block -->

If you now save the page and check the frontend result, you may be a bit disappointed because your changes do not affect the site. That’s because you have to modify the save.js file to store user input in the database when the post is saved.

Step 5: Save Data

Now open the save.js file and change the script as follows:

import { __ } from '@wordpress/i18n';
import { useBlockProps, RichText } from '@wordpress/block-editor';

export default function save( { attributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps.save();
	return (
		<RichText.Content 
			{ ...blockProps } 
			tagName="p" 
			value={ attributes.content } 
		/>
	);
}

That’s what we are doing here:

You can read more about the RichText component in the Block Editor Handbook and find the full list of props on Github.

Now let’s take it a step further. In the next section, you’ll learn how to add controls to the block toolbar.

Adding Controls to the Block Toolbar

The block toolbar contains a set of controls allowing users to manipulate portions of block content. For each toolbar control, you’ll find a component:

The core paragraph block toolbar.
The core paragraph block toolbar.

For example, you could add a text alignment control for your block. All you need to do is import two components from the @wordpress/block-editor package.

We’ll go through the same steps as the previous example:

  1. Import Required Components From WordPress Packages
  2. Include the Corresponding Elements Into Your JSX Code
  3. Define the Necessary Attributes in the block.json File
  4. Define Event Handlers
  5. Save Data

Step 1: Import BlockControls and AlignmentControl Components from @wordpress/block-editor

To add an alignment control to the block toolbar, you need two components:

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Open the edit.js file and edit the import statement as shown below:

import { 
	useBlockProps, 
	RichText, 
	AlignmentControl, 
	BlockControls 
} from '@wordpress/block-editor';

Step 2: Add BlockControls and AlignmentControl Elements

Go to the Edit function and insert the <BlockControls /> element at the same level as <RichText />. Then add and <AlignmentControl /> within <BlockControls />:

export default function Edit( { attributes, setAttributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps();
	return (
		<>
			<BlockControls>
				<AlignmentControl
					value={ attributes.align }
					onChange={ onChangeAlign }
				/>
			</BlockControls>
			<RichText 
				{ ...blockProps }
				tagName="p"
				onChange={ onChangeContent }
				allowedFormats={ [ 'core/bold', 'core/italic' ] }
				value={ attributes.content }
				placeholder={ __( 'Write your text...' ) }
				style={ { textAlign: attributes.align } }
			/>
		</>
	);
}

In the code above, <> and </> are the short syntax for declaring React fragments, which are how we return multiple elements in React.

In this example, AlignmentControl has two attributes:

We have also defined additional attributes for the RichText element (check the full list of attributes with examples)

Step 3: Define the align Attribute in block.json

Now go to the block.json file and add the align attribute:

"align": {
	"type": "string",
	"default": "none"
}

Go back to the terminal, stop the current process with ^C and start the script again with npm run start. Then go back to the block editor, refresh the page and select the block. You should see the block toolbar with an alignment control:

The Alignment Toolbar has been successfully added.
The Alignment Toolbar has been successfully added.

Now, if you try to format the block content using the new alignment controls, you’ll see that nothing happens. That’s because we haven’t defined the event handler yet.

Step 4: Define the Event Handlers

Now define onChangeAlign:

const onChangeAlign = ( newAlign ) => {
	setAttributes( { 
		align: newAlign === undefined ? 'none' : newAlign, 
	} )
}

If newAlign is undefined, then we set newAlign to none. Otherwise, we use newAlign.

Our edit.js script should be complete (for now):

export default function Edit( { attributes, setAttributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps();
	const onChangeContent = ( newContent ) => {
		setAttributes( { content: newContent } )
	}
	const onChangeAlign = ( newAlign ) => {
		setAttributes( { 
			align: newAlign === undefined ? 'none' : newAlign, 
		} )
	}
	return (
		<>
			<BlockControls>
				<AlignmentControl
					value={ attributes.align }
					onChange={ onChangeAlign }
				/>
			</BlockControls>
			<RichText 
				{ ...blockProps }
				tagName="p"
				onChange={ onChangeContent }
				allowedFormats={ [ 'core/bold', 'core/italic' ] }
				value={ attributes.content }
				placeholder={ __( 'Write your text...' ) }
				style={ { textAlign: attributes.align } }
			/>
		</>
	);
}

Now you can go back to the editor and align the block content.

We need to modify the save function to store block content and attributes in the database.

Step 5: Save Data

Open save.js and change the save function as follows:

export default function save( { attributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps.save();
	return (
		<RichText.Content 
			{ ...blockProps } 
			tagName="p" 
			value={ attributes.content } 
			style={ { textAlign: attributes.align } }
		/>
	);
}

Finally, to make the code more readable, you can extract the individual properties from the attribute object using the destructuring assignment syntax:

export default function save( { attributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps.save();
	const { content, align } = attributes;
	return (
		<RichText.Content 
			{ ...blockProps } 
			tagName="p" 
			value={ content } 
			style={ { textAlign: align } }
		/>
	);
}

Save the file, restart the process and return to the editor in Code editor mode. The code should look something like this:

<!-- wp:my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-block {"align":"right"} -->
<p class="wp-block-my-affiliate-plugin-my-affiliate-block" style="text-align:right">This is my first editable <strong><em>Gutenberg</em></strong> <em>block</em> 🤓</p>
<!-- /wp:my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-block -->
Align text right.
Align text right.

And that’s it! You have just added an alignment control to the block toolbar 🤓

You can read more about block toolbar controls in the Block Editor Handbook.

Customizing The Block Settings Sidebar

You can also add controls to the block Settings Sidebar (or even create a new sidebar for your application).

The API provides an InspectorControls component for that.

The Block Editor Handbook explains how to use the Settings Sidebar:

The Settings Sidebar is used to display less-often-used settings or settings that require more screen space. The Settings Sidebar should be used for block-level settings only.

If you have settings that affect only selected content inside a block (example: the “bold” setting for selected text inside a paragraph): do not place it inside the Settings Sidebar. The Settings Sidebar is displayed even when editing a block in HTML mode, so it should only contain block-level settings.

Again:

  1. Import Required Components From WordPress Packages
  2. Include the Corresponding Elements Into Your JSX Code
  3. Define the Necessary Attributes in the block.json File
  4. Define Event Handlers
  5. Save Data

Step 1. Import InspectorControls and PanelColorSettings Components from @wordpress/block-editor

You can add several controls to allow users to customize specific aspects of the block. For example, you can provide a color control panel. To do so, you will need to import the InspectorControls and PanelColorSettings components from the block-editor module:

import { 
	useBlockProps, 
	RichText, 
	AlignmentControl, 
	BlockControls,
	InspectorControls,
	PanelColorSettings
} from '@wordpress/block-editor';

Step 2: Include the Corresponding Elements Into Your JSX code

Now you can add the corresponding elements to the JSX returned by the Edit function:

export default function Edit( { attributes, setAttributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps();
	const onChangeContent = ( newContent ) => {
		setAttributes( { content: newContent } )
	}
	const onChangeAlign = ( newAlign ) => {
		setAttributes( { 
			align: newAlign === undefined ? 'none' : newAlign, 
		} )
	}
	return (
		<>
			<InspectorControls>
				<PanelColorSettings 
					title={ __( 'Color settings', 'my-affiliate-block' ) }
					initialOpen={ false }
					colorSettings={ [
						{
						  value: textColor,
						  onChange: onChangeTextColor,
						  label: __( 'Text color', 'my-affiliate-block' ),
						},
						{
						  value: backgroundColor,
						  onChange: onChangeBackgroundColor,
						  label: __( 'Background color', 'my-affiliate-block' ),
						}
					] }
				/>
			</InspectorControls>
			<BlockControls>
				<AlignmentControl
					value={ attributes.align }
					onChange={ onChangeAlign }
				/>
			</BlockControls>
			<RichText 
				{ ...blockProps }
				tagName="p"
				onChange={ onChangeContent }
				allowedFormats={ [ 'core/bold', 'core/italic' ] }
				value={ attributes.content }
				placeholder={ __( 'Write your text...', 'my-affiliate-block' ) }
				style={ { textAlign: align, backgroundColor: backgroundColor, color: textColor } }
			/>
		</>
	);
}

Note that we have also updated the style attribute of the RichText element:

<RichText 
	 { ...blockProps }
	 tagName="p"
	 onChange={ onChangeContent }
	 allowedFormats={ [ 'core/bold', 'core/italic' ] }
	 value={ content }
	 placeholder={ __( 'Write your text...', 'my-affiliate-block' ) }
	 style={ { textAlign: align, backgroundColor: backgroundColor, color: textColor } }
/>

Step 3: Define the Necessary Attributes in block.json

Now define the backgroundColor and textColor attributes in the block.json file:

"attributes": {
	"content": {
		"type": "string",
		"source": "html",
		"selector": "p"
	},
	"align": {
		"type": "string",
		"default": "none"
	},
	"backgroundColor": {
		"type": "string"
	},	 
	"textColor": {
		"type": "string"
	}
},

Step 4: Define the Event Handlers

Now you need to define two functions to update backgroundColor and textColor on user input:

const onChangeBackgroundColor = ( newBackgroundColor ) => {
	setAttributes( { backgroundColor: newBackgroundColor } )
}
const onChangeTextColor = ( newTextColor ) => {
	setAttributes( { textColor: newTextColor } )
}

Step 5: Save Data

One last step: Open the save.js file and change the script as follows:

export default function save( { attributes } ) {
	const blockProps = useBlockProps.save();
	const { content, align, backgroundColor, textColor } = attributes;
	return (
		<RichText.Content 
			{ ...blockProps } 
			tagName="p" 
			value={ content } 
			style={ { textAlign: align, backgroundColor: backgroundColor, color: textColor } }
		/>
	);
}

Now stop the process (^C) and run npm run start again. Refresh the page, delete any instance of your block and add it again to your post:

A custom block with a Color Settings panel.
A custom block with a Color Settings panel.

Make your changes, save the post, and view it in the frontend. The changes you made in the block editor should be reflected on the front site.

In this section, you’ll add new components to your block type:

Step 1. Import Components from @wordpress/components

Now you need to import several components from @wordpress/components. Open your edit.js file and add the following import statement:

import {
	TextControl,
	PanelBody,
	PanelRow,
	ToggleControl,
	ExternalLink
} from '@wordpress/components';

Step 2. Include the Corresponding Elements Into Your JSX Code

You will first add the ExternalLink element at the same level of RichText in a div container:

<div { ...blockProps }>
	<RichText 
		...
	/>
	<ExternalLink 
		href={ affiliateLink }
		className="affiliate-button"
		rel={ hasLinkNofollow ? "nofollow" : "" }
	>
			{ linkLabel }
	</ExternalLink>

</div>

The ExternalLink component is not documented, so we referred to the component itself to get the list of available attributes. Here we’re using href, className, and rel attributes.

By default, the rel attribute value is set to noopener noreferrer. Our code will add the nofollow keyword to the rel attribute of the resulting a tag when the toggle control is on.

Now you can add link settings to the block sidebar.

First, you’ll add a PanelBody element inside InspectorControls at the same level as PanelColorSettings:

<InspectorControls>
	<PanelColorSettings 
	...
	/>
	<PanelBody 
		title={ __( 'Link Settings', 'my-affiliate-block' )}
		initialOpen={true}
	>
	...
	</PanelBody>
</InspectorControls>

Here’s what we’re doing with this:

  1. The title attribute provides the panel title.
  2. initialOpen sets whether or not the panel is initially open.

Next, we’ll add two PanelRow elements inside PanelBody, and a TextControl element inside each PanelRow:

<PanelBody 
	title={ __( 'Link Settings', 'my-affiliate-block' )}
	initialOpen={true}
>
	<PanelRow>
		<fieldset>
			<TextControl
				label={__( 'Affiliate link', 'my-affiliate-block' )}
				value={ affiliateLink }
				onChange={ onChangeAffiliateLink }
				help={ __( 'Add your affiliate link', 'my-affiliate-block' )}
			/>
		</fieldset>
	</PanelRow>
	<PanelRow>
		<fieldset>
			<TextControl
				label={__( 'Link label', 'my-affiliate-block' )}
				value={ linkLabel }
				onChange={ onChangeLinkLabel }
				help={ __( 'Add link label', 'my-affiliate-block' )}
			/>
		</fieldset>
	</PanelRow>
</PanelBody>

The code above should now look pretty straightforward. The two text controls allow users to set link label and URL.

We’ll also add an additional PanelRow with a ToggleControl to switch on/off a specific option, such as whether to include an attribute or not:

<PanelRow>
	<fieldset>
		<ToggleControl
			label="Add rel = nofollow"
			help={
				hasLinkNofollow
					? 'Has rel nofollow.'
					: 'No rel nofollow.'
			}
			checked={ hasLinkNofollow }
			onChange={ toggleNofollow }
		/>
	</fieldset>
</PanelRow>

Step 3: Define the Necessary Attributes in block.json

Now define the affiliateLink, linkLabel, and hasLinkNofollow attributes in the block.json file:

"affiliateLink": {
	"type": "string",
	"default": ""
},
"linkLabel": {
	"type": "string",
	"default": "Check it out!"
},
"hasLinkNofollow": {
	"type": "boolean",
	"default": false
}

Nothing more to add here! Let’s move on to defining the event handling functions.

Step 4: Define the Event Handlers

Get back to the edit.js file and add the following functions:

const onChangeAffiliateLink = ( newAffiliateLink ) => {
	setAttributes( { affiliateLink: newAffiliateLink === undefined ? '' : newAffiliateLink } )
}

const onChangeLinkLabel = ( newLinkLabel ) => {
	setAttributes( { linkLabel: newLinkLabel === undefined ? '' : newLinkLabel } )
}

const toggleNofollow = () => {
	setAttributes( { hasLinkNofollow: ! hasLinkNofollow } )
}

These functions update the corresponding attribute values on user input.

Step 5: Save Data

Last, we have to update the save function in save.js:

export default function save( { attributes } ) {

	const { align, content, backgroundColor, textColor, affiliateLink, linkLabel, hasLinkNofollow } = attributes;

	const blockProps = useBlockProps.save();

	return (
		<div { ...blockProps }>
			<RichText.Content 
				tagName="p" 
				value={ content } 
				style={ { backgroundColor: backgroundColor, color: textColor } }
			/>
			<p>
				<a 
					href={ affiliateLink }
					className="affiliate-button"
					rel={ hasLinkNofollow ? "nofollow" : "noopener noreferrer" }
				>
					{ linkLabel }
				</a>
			</p>
		</div>
	);
}

Note that here we have used a regular a element instead of ExternalLink:

Affiliate block link settings.
Affiliate block link settings.

Now save data and restart your environment.

Adding Multiple Block Styles

In a previous section, you learned how to add a block toolbar control allowing users to align the user input. We can add more style controls to the block toolbar, but we can also provide a set of predefined block styles the user can choose from with a single click.

For this purpose, we’re going to use a useful feature of the Block API: Block Styles.

All you need to do is define the block.json styles property and declare the corresponding styles in your stylesheets.

For example, you can add the following array of styles:

"styles": [
	{
		"name": "default",
		"label": "Default",
		"isDefault": true
	},
	{
		"name": "border",
		"label": "Border"
	}
],

With this, you’ve just added a default style and an additional style called border. Now go back to the block editor:

Two predefined block styles.
Two predefined block styles.

The styles will be available to the user by clicking on the block switcher and then looking for the Styles panel in the Block Settings Sidebar.

Select a style and check the classes applied to the p element. Right-click on the block and Inspect. A new class has been added with a name structured as follows:

is-style-{style-name}

If you checked the “Border” style, then an is-style-border class will be added to the p element. If you checked the “Default” style, then an is-style-default class will be added instead.

Now you only have to declare the CSS properties. Open the editor.scss file and replace the current styles with the following:

.wp-block-my-affiliate-plugin-my-affiliate-block {
	padding: 2px;
	&.is-style-default{
		border: 0;
	}
	&.is-style-border{
		border: 1px solid #000;
	}
}

Now you can do the same with style.scss:

.wp-block-my-affiliate-plugin-my-affiliate-block {
	&.is-style-default{
		border: 0;
	}
	&.is-style-border{
		border: 1px solid #000;
	}
}

Stop the process (^C) and run npm run start again.

And that’s it! Refresh the page, and have fun with your new block styles:

Affiliate block styles.
Affiliate block styles.

Nesting Gutenberg Blocks With the InnerBlocks Component

Although fully functional, our Affiliate Block is still not very appealing. To make it more engaging for the audience, we could add an image.

This may add a layer of complexity to our block, but fortunately, you don’t need to reinvent the wheel because Gutenberg provides a specific component you can use to create a structure of nested blocks.

The InnerBlocks component is defined as follows:

InnerBlocks exports a pair of components which can be used in block implementations to enable nested block content.

First, you’ll need to create a new .js file in the src folder. In our example, we’ll call this file container.js.

Now you’ll need to import the new resource into the index.js file:

import './container';

Go back to container.js and import the necessary components:

import { registerBlockType } from "@wordpress/blocks";
import { __ } from "@wordpress/i18n";
import {
	useBlockProps, 
	InnerBlocks 
} from "@wordpress/block-editor";

The next step is defining a template providing the structure inside which the blocks will be placed. In the following example, we define a template consisting of two columns containing a core Image block and our custom Affiliate block:

const TEMPLATE = [ [ 'core/columns', { backgroundColor: 'yellow', verticalAlignment: 'center' }, [
	[ 'core/column', { templateLock: 'all' }, [
		[ 'core/image' ],
	] ],
	[ 'core/column', { templateLock: 'all' }, [
		[ 'my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-block', { placeholder: 'Enter side content...' } ],
	] ],
] ] ];

The template is structured as an array of blockTypes (block name and optional attributes).

In the code above, we used several attributes to configure the Columns and Column blocks. Specifically, the templateLock: 'all' attribute locks Column blocks so that the user won’t add, reorder or delete existing blocks. templateLock can take one of the following values:

The template is then assigned to the InnerBlocks element:

<InnerBlocks
	template={ TEMPLATE }
	templateLock="all"
/>

To prevent any compatibility issue, we also added a templateLock attribute to the InnerBlocks component (see also issue #17262 and pull #26128).

Here is our final container.js file:

import { registerBlockType } from "@wordpress/blocks";
import { __ } from "@wordpress/i18n";
import { useBlockProps, InnerBlocks } from "@wordpress/block-editor";

const TEMPLATE = [ [ 'core/columns', { backgroundColor: 'yellow', verticalAlignment: 'center' }, [
	[ 'core/column', { templateLock: 'all' }, [
		[ 'core/image' ],
	] ],
	[ 'core/column', { templateLock: 'all' }, [
		[ 'my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-block', { placeholder: 'Enter side content...' } ],
	] ],
] ] ];

registerBlockType('my-affiliate-plugin/my-affiliate-container-block', {
	title: __( 'Container', 'my-affiliate-block' ),
	category: 'design',

	edit( { className } ) {
		
		return(
			<div className={ className }>
				<InnerBlocks
					template={ TEMPLATE }
					templateLock="all"
				/>
			</div>
		)
	},

	save() {
		const blockProps = useBlockProps.save();
		return(
			<div { ...blockProps }>
				<InnerBlocks.Content />
			</div>
		)
	},
});
The nested Affiliate block in the editor.
The nested Affiliate block in the editor.

Additional Improvements

Our block is fully functional, but we could improve it a bit with some small changes.

We assigned the backgroundColor attribute to the paragraph generated by the RichText component. However, we may prefer to assign the background color to the container div:

So, change the edit.js file and save.js divs as follows:

<div 
	{ ...blockProps }
	style={ { backgroundColor: backgroundColor } }
>
...
</div>

This will allow the user to change the background of the entire block.

On the other hand, a more relevant change involves the useBlockProps method. In the original code, we defined the constant blockProps as follows:

const blockProps = useBlockProps();

But we can use the useBlockProps more effectively passing a set of properties. For example, we can import classnames from the classnames module and set the wrapper class name accordingly.

In the following example, we assign a class name based on the value of the align attribute (edit.js):

import classnames from 'classnames';

...

export default function Edit( { attributes, setAttributes } ) {
	...
	const blockProps = useBlockProps( {
		className: classnames( {
			[ `has-text-align-${ align }` ]: align,
		} )
	} );
	...
}

We’ll do the same change in the save.js file:

import classnames from 'classnames';

...

export default function save( { attributes } ) {
	...
	const blockProps = useBlockProps.save({
		className: classnames( {
			[ `has-text-align-${ align }` ]: align,
		} )
	});
	...
}

And that’s a wrap! You can now run the build for production.

If you're looking for an in-depth guide to getting started with Gutenberg block development, this massive guide is for you. Check it out and start building your Gutenberg blocks today! 👷‍♀️🧱Click to Tweet

Summary

And here we are, at the end of this incredible journey! We started with the configuration of the development environment and ended up creating a complete block type.

As we mentioned in the introduction, a solid knowledge of Node.js, Webpack, Babel, and React is essential for creating advanced Gutenberg blocks and positioning yourself in the market as a professional Gutenberg developer.

But you don’t need to have established React experience to start having fun with block development, though. Block development could give you motivation and goals to gain increasingly broad skills in the technologies behind Gutenberg blocks.

This guide, therefore, is far from being complete. It’s merely an introduction to a wide variety of topics that will help you get started building your very first Gutenberg blocks.

For this reason, we recommend you deepen your knowledge by carefully reading online documentation and guides. Among the many resources available out there, we recommend the following:

If you’re just starting with WordPress development, you may want to understand the basic concepts of frontend development. Here is a quick list of resources that may help you get started:

And remember that the complete code of the examples of this guide is available on Gist.

Now it’s your turn: Have you developed any Gutenberg blocks? What are the main difficulties you have experienced so far? Let us know about your experience in the comments!


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